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Peanut Butter Noodles

Categories: Food & Cooking

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From Bethany of Bethany Actually

bowl of yum

makes 6-8 servings

One of the nicest things about this recipe is its flexibility. If you don’t like peppers, you can substitute eggplant or snow peas or green beans or whatever other vegetable you think would taste good in a stir-fry. Chicken is good, but pork or beef work equally as well.

  • 1/2 c. peanut butter
  • 2/3 c. water
  • 1/4 c. soy sauce
  • 1/4 c. lime juice
  • 1/4 c. brown sugar
  • 1/4 tsp. red pepper flakes, or to taste
  • 2 T. sesame oil
  • 2 T. peanut oil or vegetable oil
  • 1-2 T. grated ginger root
  • 2-3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 boneless skinless chicken breasts, cut in bite-size pieces
  • 1/2 red onion, sliced lengthwise
  • 1 leek, sliced into matchstick pieces (white and light green parts only)
  • 2 small zucchini, cut into thin strips
  • 2 sweet peppers, seeded and cut into thin strips
  • 1 carrot, washed and cut into matchstick pieces or thin slices
  • 12 oz. Linguine, broken into thirds
  • 1/2 c. chopped fresh cilantro
  1. Make the peanut sauce: In a heatproof measuring cup or bowl, combine peanut butter, water, soy sauce, lime juice, brown sugar, red pepper flakes, and sesame oil. Microwave at High for 2 minutes, stirring twice. (Or combine ingredients in a small saucepan and stir over medium heat until mixture is warm and smooth.) Set aside.
  2. In a large pot of boiling salted water, cook linguine al dente. Drain and return to pot. Add a little of the sauce and toss to prevent noodles from sticking to each other.
  3. In wok or large nonstick skillet, heat 1 T. peanut oil over med-high heat. Add ginger root garlic, and onion; cook, stirring, for 30 seconds. Add chicken and cook, stirring, till all chicken is cooked, 3-4 minutes. Add chicken to the noodles.
  4. Add another tablespoon of oil to the skillet. Once it’s hot, add vegetables and cook, stirring, for 2-3 minutes or until vegetables are just tender-crisp. Add the rest of the sauce to the skillet and stir till heated through.
  5. Add vegetables to the noodles and chicken in the pot and toss it all together till everything is mixed and the sauce coats everything. Sprinkle with cilantro. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Enjoy!

What’s for dinner: Rotini with vodka sauce

Categories: Food & Cooking

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The alcohol in the vodka sauce cooks off in this dish, leaving behind just an additional level of depth, too subtle to identify.  The small amount of cream turns the sauce a pretty deep pink, and adds lovely texture and flavor.

  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/4 cup chopped onion
  • 1/2 teaspoon hot pepper flakes
  • 1/4 cup vodka
  • 1 (35-ounce) can crushed tomatoes in puree
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
  • 1/4 cup cream
  • 1 pound dried rotini (corkscrew) pasta
  • Freshly grated Parmesan cheese (optional)

1. Heat the butter and olive oil in a medium-sized saucepan over medium heat.  When the butter is melted, add the onion and red pepper flakes and saute until the onion is tender, about 3 minutes.  Add the vodka, tun up the heat to medium high, and saute until the vodka is almost evaporated, about 4 minutes.  Add the tomatoes, salt and pepper, and cook ove medium heat until it thicken a bit, about 10 minutes.

2. Reduce the heat to low, add the cream and allow to simmer gently for about 3 minutes.

3. Meanwhile, cook the pasta in a large pot of salted water until al dente, according to package directions.  Drain, transfer to a serving dish, add the sauce and toss to combine.  Sprinkle with Parmesan cheese, if desired and serve, passing extra Parmesan at the table if you like.

What’s for dinner?: Winter vegetable soup

Categories: Food & Cooking

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You may well have all of these ingredients already in your kitchen.  There is no limit to the amount of times you hear that you can adapt a soup recipes to your likes and what is on hand.  This is a perfect example.  Use cannellini instead of chickpeas, add whatever herbs you like, use other diced root vegetables, use shallots instead of onions, use vegetable broth, leave out anything you don’t have.  This thickens up considerably and gets better over time, so make it and heat up bowls all week long.

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 cup chopped onion
  • 1 cup chopped carrot
  • 1 cup diced peeled sweet potato
  • 1/2 cup chopped celery
  • 2 teaspoons minced garlic
  • 2 cups chopped or shredded cabbage
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
  • 1 cup uncooked rice
  • 8 cups chicken both
  • 2 cups water
  • 1 cup frozen peas
  • 1 (15.5 ounce) can chickpeas, drained and rinsed
  • 1 cup diced cooked chicken or pork (optional)
  • Shot of hot sauce


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What’s for dinner?: Stir fried rice with pork and vegetables

Categories: Food & Cooking

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Serves 4 to 6

Once you get the hang of stir-fried rice, then you will look at any pot of leftover rice as an opportunity for a new dish.  Leftover pork chops and some broccoli that was starting to look a bit tired were the inspiration for this one.  You can absolutely use any kind of meat or vegetables and the proportions can also be varied.  Stir fries are a very forgiving dish.  If you skip the meat all together, you’ll have a vegetarian dish, and if you want to skip the eggs, then you’re in vegan-land.


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What’s for dinner?: Lemon chicken and soy glazed sugar snap peas

Categories: Food & Cooking

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Lemon chicken

Serves 4

This is just a very simple roast chicken, but because it uses chicken parts instead of a whole chicken, you don’t have to worry about carving if before dinner.  Let the chicken sit for 5 to 10 minutes before serving, which allows it to reincorporate its juices. This is great served with orzo or other small pasta, rice, mashed potatoes, any comforting starch, and a salad (click here for an easy vinaigrette recipe).  Serve the pan juices over the starch, or offer up crusty bread to mop it up. You can also add the sugar glazed snap peas as a nice side dish (recipe below).

  • 2 lemons, halved
  • 4 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 3 tablespoons teaspoon olive oil
  • Coarse salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
  • 1 chicken (3 1/2 pounds), cut into 8 pieces

1. Preheat oven to 450°F.
2. In a large bowl or a large zipper top bag, squeeze the lemon juice from the lemons, and toss the skins right in.  Add the garlic, oregano, olive oil and salt and pepper and stir or squish to combine.  Add the chicken parts and toss until they are well coated (if using a zipper top bag, just seal the bag and shake around until everything is coated.)  Marinate for 30 minutes at room temperature, if you have time.
3. Place the chicken with the marinade poured over, skin side up, on a large rimmed baking sheet. Roast the chicken, until golden brown and cooked through, about 30 to 35 minutes.

Soy glazed sugar snap peas

Soy sauce and butter might seem like an unusual combination, but it really really works.  You can use snow peas instead of the sugar snap, but they usually aren’t quite as sweet.


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What’s for dinner?: Pasta with chicken and feta

Categories: Food & Cooking

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Boy, this is easy.  And it was a huge hit with the kids and the grown ups.  I suppose if feta is too much for your kids, you cold go with a milder cheese, but it really makes the dish more interesting.  The pasta is not quite fully cooked in water so it still has a chance to soak up the seasoned chicken broth and become more flavorful.

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 pounds boneless skinless chicken breasts, trimmed
  • Kosher or coarse salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 3 shallots, finely minced
  • 2 cloves garlic, finely minced
  • 3 cups chicken broth
  • 1 pound spaghetti or linguine
  • 1 cup crumbled feta cheese
  • 1/2 cup flat-leaf parsley leaves, roughly chopped
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What’s for dinner?: Parmesan-glazed fish

Categories: Food & Cooking

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Yeah, yeah, I know, your kids don’t like fish.  But really, when is the last time you tried offering it to them?  This recipe works well with many of the mild-tasting white fish, and even though traditionalist Italians wince at the thought of using cheese with any fish or seafood, they might be willing to reconsider when they taste a piece of well-cooked, simply seasoned fish with a sprinkling of fresh Parmesan.  And boy, is it worth getting the real Parm for this – you only need ¼ cup, and it makes such a big difference in the outcome.

A handful of basil leaves, very thinly sliced (know as a chiffonade of basil) scattered across the top adds color and fresh herby flavor, for those who might be interested.

Ingredients:


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What’s for dinner?: Shrimp and pineapple fried rice

Categories: Food & Cooking

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This is lighter and fruitier than many fried rice dishes, and has an appealing sweetness to it. You can chop up the shrimp more finely, and you can also use chicken or pork, but using bigger pieces gives this nice texture. Day old cooked rice is best for this, or rice that is slightly dry, so that it stays separate.  If you like, you can offer extra soy sauce at the table.

Ingredients:

  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil, divided
  • 1 pound large peeled and de-veined shrimp, halved crosswise
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
  • 3 cups cooked white rice
  • 1 tablespoon peeled and minced ginger,
  • 1 teaspoon finely minced garlic
  • 3 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce
  • 1 cup shelled edamame or peas, defrosted
  • ½ cup thinly sliced scallions, white and light green parts
  • 1 20-ounce can crushed pineapple in juice, drained
  • 3 large eggs, beaten

Directions:
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How To Make Cinnamon Buns and/or Sweet Rolls

Categories: Food & Cooking

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By Karen of Notes From The Cookie Jar and Everything Mom

Nothing evokes childhood memories more than the smell of fresh bread, and this bread is no exception. The sweet, homey smell always sends me back to my childhood, where we would race to the kitchen to see who could grab the first bite of buns fresh from the oven. Warm, smeared with butter or home made jam, we declared them the most delicious snack in the universe. Buns were a staple at my house; Mom baked them about once a week, and if we visited my Grandma out on the farm, buns always were thrust into our outstretched hands when we were hungry. These days, I don’t bake bread often. Many people i know have turned to breadmaking machines, but I still love the feel of the dough beneath my fingers and this recipe, passed down from my Mom, is the only one I use.

When the familiar scent filled my kitchen, it was obvious that some things never change-my teenager was soon nearby ripping a bun apart greedily and declaring it a culinary victory. Make these delicious buns at your peril; either your family will beg you to make them every weekend, or you will eat them all yourself-neither of which is probably a good idea. Don’t be scared off by what looks like along and complicated recipe; they really are not that difficult.

Use the recipe just to make buns, or go crazy and use half the dough for extra sinful cinnamon buns. The recipe is also very easily halved.


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What’s for dinner?: Green salad with buttermilk dressing

Categories: Food & Cooking

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Serves 4 to 6

A simple buttermilk dressing is very refreshing and — while creamy — not too heavy, thanks to the buttermilk, which contrary to its name is very low in fat.  You can add any other veggies to this salad, such as mushrooms, radishes, cherry or grape tomatoes, sliced cucumber, but it also nice as a simple plain lettuce salad.  It’s nice with slightly spicy food, since the dressing is cooling.

  • 8 cups shredded romaine, green leaf or Boston lettuce
  • ½ cup buttermilk
  • 1/4 cup sour cream
  • 1/4 teaspoon coarse salt
  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon white wine vinegar
  • ½ teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • ½ teaspoon finely minced garlic
  • 1 teaspoon minced fresh parsley
  • Freshly ground pepper to taste

1.  Place the lettuce in a large serving bowl.

2. In a small container with a lid, combine the buttermilk, sour cream, salt, olive oil, white wine vinegar, mustard, garlic, parley and pepper.  Shake well, and pour over the lettuce. Toss to combine.

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